testify Testing mocking golang assertions Go Shell toolkit
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stretchr

Description

A toolkit with common assertions and mocks that plays nicely with the standard library

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Testify - Thou Shalt Write Tests

ℹ️ We are working on testify v2 and would love to hear what you'd like to see in it, have your say here: https://cutt.ly/testify

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Go code (golang) set of packages that provide many tools for testifying that your code will behave as you intend.

Features include:

Get started:

assert
package

The

assert
package provides some helpful methods that allow you to write better test code in Go.
  • Prints friendly, easy to read failure descriptions
  • Allows for very readable code
  • Optionally annotate each assertion with a message

See it in action:

package yours

import ( "testing" "github.com/stretchr/testify/assert" )

func TestSomething(t *testing.T) {

// assert equality assert.Equal(t, 123, 123, "they should be equal")

// assert inequality assert.NotEqual(t, 123, 456, "they should not be equal")

// assert for nil (good for errors) assert.Nil(t, object)

// assert for not nil (good when you expect something) if assert.NotNil(t, object) {

// now we know that object isn't nil, we are safe to make
// further assertions without causing any errors
assert.Equal(t, "Something", object.Value)

}

}

  • Every assert func takes the
    testing.T
    object as the first argument. This is how it writes the errors out through the normal
    go test
    capabilities.
  • Every assert func returns a bool indicating whether the assertion was successful or not, this is useful for if you want to go on making further assertions under certain conditions.

if you assert many times, use the below:

package yours

import ( "testing" "github.com/stretchr/testify/assert" )

func TestSomething(t *testing.T) { assert := assert.New(t)

// assert equality assert.Equal(123, 123, "they should be equal")

// assert inequality assert.NotEqual(123, 456, "they should not be equal")

// assert for nil (good for errors) assert.Nil(object)

// assert for not nil (good when you expect something) if assert.NotNil(object) {

// now we know that object isn't nil, we are safe to make
// further assertions without causing any errors
assert.Equal("Something", object.Value)

} }

require
package

The

require
package provides same global functions as the
assert
package, but instead of returning a boolean result they terminate current test.

See t.FailNow for details.

mock
package

The

mock
package provides a mechanism for easily writing mock objects that can be used in place of real objects when writing test code.

An example test function that tests a piece of code that relies on an external object

testObj
, can setup expectations (testify) and assert that they indeed happened:
package yours

import ( "testing" "github.com/stretchr/testify/mock" )

/* Test objects */

// MyMockedObject is a mocked object that implements an interface // that describes an object that the code I am testing relies on. type MyMockedObject struct{ mock.Mock }

// DoSomething is a method on MyMockedObject that implements some interface // and just records the activity, and returns what the Mock object tells it to. // // In the real object, this method would do something useful, but since this // is a mocked object - we're just going to stub it out. // // NOTE: This method is not being tested here, code that uses this object is. func (m *MyMockedObject) DoSomething(number int) (bool, error) {

args := m.Called(number) return args.Bool(0), args.Error(1)

}

/* Actual test functions */

// TestSomething is an example of how to use our test object to // make assertions about some target code we are testing. func TestSomething(t *testing.T) {

// create an instance of our test object testObj := new(MyMockedObject)

// setup expectations testObj.On("DoSomething", 123).Return(true, nil)

// call the code we are testing targetFuncThatDoesSomethingWithObj(testObj)

// assert that the expectations were met testObj.AssertExpectations(t)

}

// TestSomethingWithPlaceholder is a second example of how to use our test object to // make assertions about some target code we are testing. // This time using a placeholder. Placeholders might be used when the // data being passed in is normally dynamically generated and cannot be // predicted beforehand (eg. containing hashes that are time sensitive) func TestSomethingWithPlaceholder(t *testing.T) {

// create an instance of our test object testObj := new(MyMockedObject)

// setup expectations with a placeholder in the argument list testObj.On("DoSomething", mock.Anything).Return(true, nil)

// call the code we are testing targetFuncThatDoesSomethingWithObj(testObj)

// assert that the expectations were met testObj.AssertExpectations(t)

}

For more information on how to write mock code, check out the API documentation for the

mock
package.

You can use the mockery tool to autogenerate the mock code against an interface as well, making using mocks much quicker.

suite
package

The

suite
package provides functionality that you might be used to from more common object oriented languages. With it, you can build a testing suite as a struct, build setup/teardown methods and testing methods on your struct, and run them with 'go test' as per normal.

An example suite is shown below:

// Basic imports
import (
    "testing"
    "github.com/stretchr/testify/assert"
    "github.com/stretchr/testify/suite"
)

// Define the suite, and absorb the built-in basic suite // functionality from testify - including a T() method which // returns the current testing context type ExampleTestSuite struct { suite.Suite VariableThatShouldStartAtFive int }

// Make sure that VariableThatShouldStartAtFive is set to five // before each test func (suite *ExampleTestSuite) SetupTest() { suite.VariableThatShouldStartAtFive = 5 }

// All methods that begin with "Test" are run as tests within a // suite. func (suite *ExampleTestSuite) TestExample() { assert.Equal(suite.T(), 5, suite.VariableThatShouldStartAtFive) }

// In order for 'go test' to run this suite, we need to create // a normal test function and pass our suite to suite.Run func TestExampleTestSuite(t *testing.T) { suite.Run(t, new(ExampleTestSuite)) }

For a more complete example, using all of the functionality provided by the suite package, look at our example testing suite

For more information on writing suites, check out the API documentation for the

suite
package.

Suite
object has assertion methods:
// Basic imports
import (
    "testing"
    "github.com/stretchr/testify/suite"
)

// Define the suite, and absorb the built-in basic suite // functionality from testify - including assertion methods. type ExampleTestSuite struct { suite.Suite VariableThatShouldStartAtFive int }

// Make sure that VariableThatShouldStartAtFive is set to five // before each test func (suite *ExampleTestSuite) SetupTest() { suite.VariableThatShouldStartAtFive = 5 }

// All methods that begin with "Test" are run as tests within a // suite. func (suite *ExampleTestSuite) TestExample() { suite.Equal(suite.VariableThatShouldStartAtFive, 5) }

// In order for 'go test' to run this suite, we need to create // a normal test function and pass our suite to suite.Run func TestExampleTestSuite(t *testing.T) { suite.Run(t, new(ExampleTestSuite)) }


Installation

To install Testify, use

go get
:
go get github.com/stretchr/testify

This will then make the following packages available to you:

github.com/stretchr/testify/assert
github.com/stretchr/testify/require
github.com/stretchr/testify/mock
github.com/stretchr/testify/suite
github.com/stretchr/testify/http (deprecated)

Import the

testify/assert
package into your code using this template:
package yours

import ( "testing" "github.com/stretchr/testify/assert" )

func TestSomething(t *testing.T) {

assert.True(t, true, "True is true!")

}


Staying up to date

To update Testify to the latest version, use

go get -u github.com/stretchr/testify
.

Supported go versions

We support the two major Go versions, which are 1.13 and 1.14 at the moment.


Contributing

Please feel free to submit issues, fork the repository and send pull requests!

When submitting an issue, we ask that you please include a complete test function that demonstrates the issue. Extra credit for those using Testify to write the test code that demonstrates it.

Code generation is used. Look for

CODE GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY
at the top of some files. Run
go generate ./...
to update generated files.

We also chat on the Gophers Slack group in the

#testify
and
#testify-dev
channels.

License

This project is licensed under the terms of the MIT license.

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