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nodejs
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Description

Zero-runtime-dependency package acting as bridge between Node projects and their package managers

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corepack

Corepack is a zero-runtime-dependency Node.js script that acts as a bridge between Node.js projects and the package managers they are intended to be used with during development. In practical terms, Corepack will let you use Yarn and pnpm without having to install them - just like what currently happens with npm, which is shipped by Node.js by default.

Important: At the moment, Corepack only covers Yarn and pnpm. Given that we have little control on the npm project, we prefer to focus on the Yarn and pnpm use cases. As a result, Corepack doesn't have any effect at all on the way you use npm.

How to Install

Default Installs

Corepack is distributed by default with Node.js 16.9, but is opt-in for the time being. Run

corepack enable
to install the required shims.

Manual Installs

Click here to see how to install Corepack using npm

First uninstall your global Yarn and pnpm binaries (just leave npm). In general, you'd do this by running the following command:

npm uninstall -g yarn pnpm

# That should be enough, but if you installed Yarn without going through npm it might
# be more tedious - for example, you might need to run `brew uninstall yarn` as well.

Then install Corepack:

npm install -g corepack

We do acknowledge the irony and overhead of using npm to install Corepack, which is at least part of why the preferred option is to use the Corepack version that is distributed along with Node.js itself.

Usage

Just use your package managers as you usually would. Run

yarn install
in Yarn projects,
pnpm install
in pnpm projects, and
npm
in npm projects. Corepack will catch these calls, and depending on the situation:
  • If the local project is configured for the package manager you're using, Corepack will silently download and cache the latest compatible version.

  • If the local project is configured for a different package manager, Corepack will request you to run the command again using the right package manager - thus avoiding corruptions of your install artifacts.

  • If the local project isn't configured for any package manager, Corepack will assume that you know what you're doing, and will use whatever package manager version has been pinned as "known good release". Check the relevant section for more details.

Known Good Releases

When running Yarn or pnpm within projects that don't list a supported package manager, Corepack will default to a set of Known Good Releases. In a way, you can compare this to Node.js, where each version ships with a specific version of npm.

The Known Good Releases can be updated system-wide using the

--activate
flag from the
corepack prepare
and
corepack hydrate
commands.

Offline Workflow

The utility commands detailed in the next section.

  • Either you can use the network while building your container image, in which case you'll simply run

    corepack prepare
    to make sure that your image includes the Last Known Good release for the specified package manager.
    • If you want to have all Last Known Good releases for all package managers, just use the
      --all
      flag which will do just that.
  • Or you're publishing your project to a system where the network is unavailable, in which case you'll preemptively generate a package manager archive from your local computer (using

    corepack prepare -o
    ) before storing it somewhere your container will be able to access (for example within your repository). After that it'll just be a matter of running
    corepack hydrate 
    to setup the cache.

Utility Commands

corepack [@] [... args]

This meta-command runs the specified package manager in the local folder. You can use it to force an install to run with a given version, which can be useful when looking for regressions.

Note that those commands still check whether the local project is configured for the given package manager (ie you won't be able to run

corepack yarn install
on a project where the
packageManager
field references
pnpm
).

corepack enable [... name]

| Option | Description | | --- | --- | |

--install-directory
| Add the shims to the specified location |

This command will detect where Node.js is installed and will create shims next to it for each of the specified package managers (or all of them if the command is called without parameters). Note that the npm shims will not be installed unless explicitly requested, as npm is currently distributed with Node.js through other means.

corepack disable [... name]

| Option | Description | | --- | --- | |

--install-directory
| Remove the shims to the specified location |

This command will detect where Node.js is installed and will remove the shims from there.

corepack prepare [... [email protected]]

| Option | Description | | --- | --- | |

--all
| Prepare the "Last Known Good" version of all supported package managers | |
-o,--output
| Also generate an archive containing the package managers | |
--activate
| Also update the "Last Known Good" release |

This command will download the given package managers (or the one configured for the local project if no argument is passed in parameter) and store it within the Corepack cache. If the

-o,--output
flag is set (optionally with a path as parameter), an archive will also be generated that can be used by the
corepack hydrate
command.

corepack hydrate 

| Option | Description | | --- | --- | |

--activate
| Also update the "Last Known Good" release |

This command will retrieve the given package manager from the specified archive and will install it within the Corepack cache, ready to be used without further network interaction.

Environment Variables

  • COREPACK_ROOT
    has no functional impact on Corepack itself; it's automatically being set in your environment by Corepack when it shells out to the underlying package managers, so that they can feature-detect its presence (useful for commands like
    yarn init
    ).

Contributing

If you want to build corepack yourself, you can build the project like this:

  1. Clone this repository
  2. Run
    yarn build
    (no need for
    yarn install
    )
  3. The
    dist/
    directory now contains the corepack build and the shims
  4. Call
    node ./dist/corepack --help
    and behold

You can also run the tests with

yarn jest
(still no install needed).

Design

Various tidbits about Corepack's design are explained in more details in DESIGN.md.

License (MIT)

Copyright © Corepack contributors

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

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