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larose
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Ultimate Time Tracker - A simple command-line time tracker written in Python

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Ultimate Time Tracker

Ultimate Time Tracker (utt) is a simple command-line time tracking application written in Python.

Table of Contents

Quick Start

Prerequisites

utt
requires Python version 3.7 or above.

Installing
utt

Install

utt
from PyPI:

$ pip install utt

hello

Say hello when you arrive in the morning:

$ utt hello

add

Add a task when you have finished working on it:

$ utt add "programming"

report

Show report:

$ utt report

------------------------ Monday, Jul 08, 2013 (week 28) ------------------------

Working Time: 0h07 Break Time: 0h00

----------------------------------- Projects -----------------------------------

(0h07) : programming

---------------------------------- Activities ----------------------------------

(0h07) : programming

----------------------------------- Details ------------------------------------

(0h07) 08:27-08:34 programming

edit

Edit your timesheet:

$ utt edit

Commands

hello

$ utt hello
should be the first command you execute when you start your day. It tells
utt
that you are now tracking your time.

Example:

$ utt hello

add

When you have completed a task, add it to

utt
with the
add
command.

Example:

$ utt add programming

You add a task when you have completed it, not when you start doing it.

Activity Type

There are three types of activities: working, break and ignored. Working activities contribute to the working time, break activities to the break time and ignored activities to neither. This feature is very useful when viewing your timesheet with the

report
command as it enables
utt
to group your activities by type.

The activity type is defined by its name. If it ends with

**
it's a break activity. If it ends with
***
it's an ignored activity. Otherwise, it's a working activity.

Examples:

  • Working activity
$ utt add "task #4"
  • Break activity
$ utt add "lunch **"
  • Ignored activity
$ utt add "commuting ***"

edit

edit
opens your timesheet in a text editor so you can edit it.

Example:

$ utt edit

utt
opens the text editor defined by the environment variable
$VISUAL
and, if not set, by the environment variable
$EDITOR
. If neither is set,
utt
opens
vi
.

report

$ utt report
shows your timesheet.

Examples:

  • Timesheet for today:

    $ utt report
  • Timesheet for a specific date:

    $ utt report 2018-03-25
  • Timesheet for a period:

    $ utt report --from 2018-10-22 --to 2018-10-26

Sections

There are four sections in a report. As we will see, each one is a aggregated view of the previous one.

  1. Summary: shows the report date and the total working and break time.

  2. Projects: groups activities by project. This is useful to track the total time by projects. We will see how to specify the project for an activity.

  3. Activities: groups activities by name. This is useful to track the total time worked on a task when you have worked on it multiple times.

  4. Details: timeline of your activities.

Let's look at an example. Let's say you entered those activities throughout the day:

$ utt hello
$ utt add "project-1: task-3"
$ utt add "project-2: task-2"
$ utt add "project-1: task-1"
$ utt add "lunch **"
$ utt add "project-2: task-2"
$ utt add "project-1: task-2"

And then you view your timesheet:

$ utt report

----------------------- Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 (week 44) -----------------------

Working Time: 7h00 Break Time: 1h00

----------------------------------- Projects -----------------------------------

(5h00) project-1: task-1, task-2, task-3 (2h00) project-2: task-2

---------------------------------- Activities ----------------------------------

(2h15) project-1: task-1 (2h15) project-1: task-2 (0h30) project-1: task-3 (2h00) project-2: task-2

(1h00) : lunch **

----------------------------------- Details ------------------------------------

(0h30) 09:00-09:30 project-1: task-3 (0h15) 09:30-09:45 project-2: task-2 (2h15) 09:45-12:00 project-1: task-1 (1h00) 12:00-13:00 lunch ** (1h45) 13:00-14:45 project-2: task-2 (2h15) 14:45-17:00 project-1: task-2

The first section, the summary section, shows that you worked 7h and had a 1-hour break.

Then, the projects section shows that you worked 5h on project 1 and 2h on project 2. You can specify the project of an activity by prefixing it with a non-whitespace string followed by a colon (e.g

project-1:
,
project2:
).

The next section, the activities section, shows how long you worked on each activity. For instance, even though you worked twice on

project-2: task-2
(0h15 + 1h45), it is shown once in that section.

Finally, the details section shows a timeline of all your activity.

Report Date

You can choose the report date by passing a date to the

report
command. The date must be either an absolute date formatted as "%Y-%m-%d" or a day of the week.

Examples:

Absolute date:

$ utt report 2013-07-01

Day of the week:

$ utt report monday

If today is Wednesday, Feb 18, the report date is Monday, Feb 16.

You can also specify a date range. All the activities will be aggregated for the given time period.

To report activities from 2013-07-01 00:00:00 to 2013-12-31 23:59:59 :

$ utt report --from 2013-07-01 --to 2013-12-31

To report activities since Monday:

$ utt report --from monday

Current Activity

A

-- Current Activity --
is inserted if the current time is included in the report range.

The first duration between the parentheses (1h00) represents the working time without the current activity. The second duration between the parentheses (0h22) represents the duration of the current activity.

Example:

$ utt add "#12"
$ utt report

------------------------ Monday, Jul 08, 2013 (week 28) ------------------------

Working Time: 1h22 (1h00 + 0h22) Break Time: 0h00

----------------------------------- Projects -----------------------------------

(1h22) : #12, -- Current Activity --

---------------------------------- Activities ----------------------------------

(1h00) : #12 (0h22) : -- Current Activity --

...

You can change the current activity name with the

--current-activity
argument.

Example:

$ utt report --current-activity "#76"

------------------------ Monday, Jul 08, 2013 (week 28) ------------------------

Working Time: 1h22 (1h00 + 0h22) Break Time: 0h00

----------------------------------- Projects -----------------------------------

(1h22) : #12, #76

---------------------------------- Activities ----------------------------------

(1h00) : #12 (0h22) : #76

...

Or, you can remove the current activity with the

--no-current-activity
flag.

Example:

$ utt report --no-current-activity

------------------------ Monday, Jul 08, 2013 (week 28) ------------------------

Working Time: 1h00 Break Time: 0h00

----------------------------------- Projects -----------------------------------

(1h00) : #12

---------------------------------- Activities ----------------------------------

(1h00) : #12

stretch

Stretch the latest task to the current time:

Example:

$ utt stretch
stretched 2013-07-08 08:34 programming
        → 2013-07-08 09:00 programming

Plugins

utt can be extended by installing plugins. Unfortunately, since this is a recent feature, no plugins have been listed here yet. Write to Mathieu Larose <[email protected]> to add your plugin here.

Plugin development

See docs/CONTRIBUTING.md#how-can-i-create-a-plugin how to create a utt plugin.

Configuration

Timezone

Warning: timezone is an experimental feature.

To enable timezone support, get the config filename:

$ utt config --filename
`/home//.config/utt/utt.cfg`

Then, open it with a text editor and change it so it looks like this:

[timezone]
enabled = true

Bash Completion

utt
uses argcomplete to provide bash completion.

First, make sure

bash-completion
is installed:

  • Fedora:
    $ sudo dnf install bash-completion
  • Ubuntu:
    $ sudo apt-get install bash-completion

Then execute:

$ register-python-argcomplete utt >> ~/.bashrc

Finally, start a new shell.

Contributing

See docs/CONTRIBUTING.md for how to contribute to utt.

Contributors

License

utt is released under the GPLv3. See the LICENSE file for details.

Website

http://github.com/larose/utt

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