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About the developer

jimsalterjrs
133 Stars 3 Forks GNU General Public License v3.0 145 Commits 1 Opened issues

Description

This is a small collection of GPLv3-licensed tools to assist an intrepid researcher in testing the performance of networks, wired or wireless.

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net-hydra

net-hydra
is a multiple client controller which executes a given set of commands on multiple remote machines with an extremely high degree of simultaneity. Although net-hydra was specifically designed to be used with netburn to simultaneously test a network using multiple devices, it can be used for scheduling remote execution of any arbitrary command or commands. However, it does require
whenits
to be present on the client machines.

Since

net-hydra
uses SSH command channels, it's usable even without shared passwordless keys on the client machines - you can enter in passwords or key passphrases at runtime, and it'll use the created command channel to schedule the jobs without needing the password/passphrase again.

It's highly recommended to use

ntpd
to keep accurate time on the server and all clients.
net-hydra
will refuse to schedule jobs if all clients do not have system time accurate to within 1 second of the server's.
Usage: 
    net-hydra -c {configfile} [-t {testname}]

net-hydra requires a config file specifying [clients], [directives], and optionally
[aliases], which it uses to schedule jobs to run simultaneously in the very near future
on multiple client machines.

    # sample nethydra.conf
    [clients]
        # list each client device here, by name and as SSH will connect to them.
        #
        local0 = [email protected]
        local1 = [email protected]

    [directives]
        # These are the command(s) to be run on each client device. Directives
        # beginning with $ reference lines from the [aliases] section. Any use
        # of $when, either here or in [aliases], will be replaced with the
        # scheduled execution time, in Unix epoch seconds; $testname is replaced
                    # with the --testname argument passed to net-hydra on the command-line.
        #
        local0 = $4kstream
        local1 = /usr/bin/touch /tmp/test-$testname-$when.txt

    [aliases]
        # Defining aliases here keeps [directives] cleaner, so you can
        # see what you're doing a little more easily.
        #
        $4kstream = netburn -u http://127.0.0.1/1M.bin -r 25 -o /tmp/$testname-$when.csv

net-hydra requires the whenits command to be in the standard path on each client
machine, for use precisely scheduling the directives to execute simultaneously.

netburn

netburn
is a tool for testing network performance using an HTTP server back-end. It's similar to ApacheBench, but where ApacheBench is intended primarily to test the HTTP server itself, netburn is intended primarily to test the network between them.

It will fetch an URL for a given number of seconds, but can limit itself to a given rate in Mbps. Rather than throttling the network connection itself, netburn simply monitors the number of bits received so far, compares it to the time elapsed (in microseconds), and refuses to fetch more pages until the rate so far is at or below the specified rate limit. After testing for the number of seconds requested, netburn returns information regarding throughput and latency of requests made.

IMPORTANT NOTE about the -c {concurrency} option: if you ask for -c 10, each "page" will consist of 10 parallel fetches of URL, and the "latency" will be the amount of time it takes to get the last bit from the last concurrent child fetch. Another new "page" fetch will not begin until after ALL child fetches complete - this simulates the experience of browsing web pages with multiple resources, and is very different from ApacheBench's -c 10, which merely hammers the server as hard as possible from ten completely independent client processes!

Usage:
         netburn -u {url} 
                [-r {rate limit} ]  ... specified in Mbps (default none)
                [-t {seconds} ]     ... time to run test, default 30 
                [-o {filespec} ]    ... output filespec for CSV report 
                [--no-header ]      ... suppress header row of CSV output 
                [-h {hostname} ]    ... override system-defined hostname in CSV output
                [-c {concurrency} ] ... number of concurrent URL fetches to make per 'page' fetch
                [-q ]               ... quiet (suppress all but CSV output) 
                [-ifinfo {iface} ]  ... output detailed wifi info about {iface}
                [--percentile {n}]  ... report results at each nth percentile instead of defaults
                [--minp {n} ]       ... begin percentile reporting at nth percentile (default 50)
                [--maxp {n} ]       ... end percentile reporting at nth percentile (default 100)
                [--rnd {value} ]    ... sleep random milliseconds up to {value} before each fetch
                                        (to inject chaos into the timing of fetches)

            [--usage ]          ... you're looking at this right now 

Example:

     [email protected]:~$ netburn -u http://someserver/128K.bin -r 10

     Fetching http://someserver/128K.bin at maximum rate 10 Mbps for 30 seconds.

     Throughput so far: 10.01 Mbps
     Seconds remaining: 0

     Time elapsed: 30.2 seconds
     Number of pages fetched: 301
     Total data fetched: 37.6 MB
     Mean page length fetched: 1048576 KB
     Page length maximum deviation: 0 KB
     Throughput achieved: 10 Mbps
     Mean latency: 41.65 ms

     Worst latency: 190 ms
     99th percentile latency: 51 ms
     95th percentile latency: 46 ms
     90th percentile latency: 45 ms
     75th percentile latency: 43 ms
     Median latency: 41 ms
     Min latency: 35 ms

mailburn

Mailburn is a tool for testing network performance using an SMTP server back-end.

It will send emails for a given number of seconds, but can limit itself to a given rate in Mbps. Rather than throttling the network connection itself, mailburn simply monitors the number of messages sent so far, compares the total data to the time elapsed (in microseconds), and refuses to send more mail until the rate so far is at or below the specified rate limit. After testing for the number of seconds requested, it returns information regarding throughput and latency of emails sent. (NOTE: 'throughput' here only measures the data payload, and does not include message headers or SMTP overhead.)

You'll need an SMTP server on the back end for mailburn to send its messages to; if your goal is to test the server itself, you're set. If your goal is to test the network the SMTP traffic is moving across, I recommend Postfix's smtp-sink, which silently accepts (and dumps to /dev/null) any and all SMTP traffic.

Usage: 

     mailburn --to {valid email address} --size {msg payload size in MB} --host {SMTP server}

           [--size {MB} ]      ... size of the binary attachment in each message
           [--host {host} ]    ... the SMTP server mailburn should connect to
           [--port {port} ]    ... SMTP port (default 25)
           [-r {rate limit} ]  ... specified in Mbps (default none)
           [-t {seconds} ]     ... time to run test, default 30 
           [-o {filespec} ]    ... output filespec for CSV report 
           [--no-header ]      ... suppress header row of CSV output 
           [-q ]               ... quiet (suppress all but CSV output) 
           [-h {hostname} ]    ... override system-defined hostname in CSV output 
           [-ifinfo {iface} ]  ... output detailed wifi info about {iface}
           [--jitter {value} ] ... sleep random interval up to {value} ms before each send
           [--percentile {n} ] ... report results at each nth percentile instead of defaults
           [--minp {n} ]       ... begin percentile reporting at nth percentile (default 50)
           [--maxp {n} ]       ... end percentile reporting at nth percentile (default 100)

           [--usage ]          ... you're looking at this right now 

whenits

whenits
is a scheduler with millisecond-or-better precision. Feed it a desired execution time in Unix epoch seconds, it will do a low-CPU-power sleep until 200ms before execution time, then a high-CPU-power loop to execute as close to the precise epoch time specified as possible.
Usage:

whenits [-d] {time} {/path/to/command {arg1 arg2 arg3 ...} }

-d            ... optional: daemonize (fork and run in background).
                  You'll need this if you're scheduling commands
                  that need to run after the current shell closes.

time          ... Required. Execution time may be specified in absolute
                  epoch seconds, or relative to current time -
                  eg now+5s, now+10m, now+2h.

command       ... the command to be scheduled at {time}, along with
                  any arguments to be passed to it.

Example:

[email protected]:~$ whenits now+5s echo Hello world!

Current time is: 1495220901. Executing in 5 seconds, at 1495220906.

WARNING: I'm a foreground task! Use -d if you need to daemonize me (so I don't
         need you still connected to me when I run the task).

Hello world!

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