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expo
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Description

Expo CLI in your GitHub Actions workflow

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expo github action

Publish, build or manage your Expo app with Github Actions!

releases builds license

Usage   —   Examples   —   Caveats   —   Changelog


What's inside?

With this Expo action, you have full access to the Expo CLI itself. It allows you to fully automate the

expo publish
or
expo build
process, leaving you with more time available for your project. There are some additional features included to make the usage of this action as simple as possible, like caching and authentication.

Configuration options

This action is customizable through variables; they are defined in the

action.yml
. Here is a summary of all the variables that you can use and their purpose.

variable

default description

expo-username
| - | The username of your Expo account (e.g.
bycedric
)
expo-token
| - | The token of your Expo account (e.g.
${{ secrets.EXPO_TOKEN }}
)
expo-password
| - | The password of your Expo account (e.g.
${{ secrets.EXPO_CLI_PASSWORD }}
)
expo-version
|
latest
| The Expo CLI version to use, can be any SemVer. (e.g.
3.x
)
expo-packager
|
yarn
| The package manager to install the CLI with. (e.g.
npm
)
expo-cache
|
false
| If it should use the GitHub actions (remote) cache.
expo-cache-key
| - | An optional custom (remote) cache key. (use with caution)
expo-patch-watchers
|
true
| If it should patch the
fs.inotify.
limits
.

Never hardcode

expo-token
or
expo-password
in your workflow, use secrets to store them.

It's also recommended to set the

expo-version
to avoid breaking changes when a new major version is released.

Example workflows

Before you dive into the workflow examples, you should know the basics of GitHub Actions. You can read more about this in the GitHub Actions documentation.

  1. Publish on any push to master
  2. Cache Expo CLI for other jobs
  3. Test PRs and publish a review version
  4. Test PRs on multiple nodes and systems
  5. Test and build web every day at 08:00
  6. Authenticate using an Expo token

Publish on any push to master

Below you can see the example configuration to publish whenever the master branch is updated. The workflow listens to the

push
event and sets up Node 12 using the Setup Node Action. It also authenticates the Expo project by defining both
expo-username
and
expo-password
.
name: Expo Publish
on:
  push:
    branches:
      - master
jobs:
  publish:
    name: Install and publish
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
        with:
          node-version: 14.x
      - uses: expo/[email protected]
        with:
          expo-version: 4.x
          expo-username: ${{ secrets.EXPO_CLI_USERNAME }}
          expo-password: ${{ secrets.EXPO_CLI_PASSWORD }}
      - run: yarn install
      - run: expo publish

Cache Expo CLI for other jobs

Below you can see a slightly modified version of the example above. In this one, we enabled the built-in cache that will reuse a previously installed Expo CLI. It skips the installation part and extracts the files directly, boosting the performance of your workflow.

You can read more about the cache here

name: Expo Publish
on:
  push:
    branches:
      - master
jobs:
  publish:
    name: Install and publish
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
        with:
          node-version: 14.x
      - uses: expo/[email protected]
        with:
          expo-version: 4.x
          expo-username: ${{ secrets.EXPO_CLI_USERNAME }}
          expo-password: ${{ secrets.EXPO_CLI_PASSWORD }}
          expo-cache: true
      - run: yarn install
      - run: expo publish

Test PRs and publish a review version

Reviewing pull requests can take some time if you have to read every line of code. To make this easier, you can publish the edited version of the PR using a release channel. Below you can see an example of a workflow that publishes and comments on te PR when the app is published.

name: Expo Review
on: [pull_request]
jobs:
  publish:
    name: Install and publish
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
        with:
          node-version: 14.x
      - uses: expo/[email protected]
        with:
          expo-version: 4.x
          expo-username: ${{ secrets.EXPO_CLI_USERNAME }}
          expo-password: ${{ secrets.EXPO_CLI_PASSWORD }}
      - run: yarn install
      - run: expo publish --release-channel=pr-${{ github.event.number }}
      - uses: unsplash/[email protected]
        env:
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}
        with:
          msg: App is ready for review, you can [see it here](https://expo.io/@bycedric/use-expo?release-channel=pr-${{ github.event.number }}).

Test PRs on multiple nodes and systems

With GitHub Actions, it's reasonably easy to set up a matrix build and test the app on multiple environments. These matrixes can help to make sure your app runs smoothly on a broad set of different development machines.

If you don't need automatic authentication, you can omit the

expo-username
and
expo-password
variables.
name: Expo CI
on: [pull_request]
jobs:
  ci:
    name: Continuous Integration
    runs-on: ${{ matrix.os }}
    strategy:
      matrix:
        os: [ubuntu-latest, macOS-latest, windows-latest]
        node: [10, 12, 13]
    steps:
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
        with:
          node-version: ${{ matrix.node }}
      - uses: expo/[email protected]
        with:
          expo-version: 4.x
      - run: yarn install
      - run: yarn test
      - run: expo doctor

Test and build web every day at 08:00

You can also schedule jobs by using the cron syntax. It can help to minimize the number of updates your users have to install.

name: Expo Daily CI
on:
  schedule:
    - cron: 0 8 * * *
jobs:
  ci:
    name: Daily Continuous Integration
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
        with:
          node-version: 14.x
      - uses: expo/[email protected]
        with:
          expo-version: 4.x
      - run: yarn install
      - run: yarn test
      - run: expo build:web

Authenticate using an Expo token

Instead of username and password, you can also authenticate using a token. This might help increasing security and avoids adding username and password to your repository secrets.

name: Expo Publish
on:
  push:
    branches:
      - master
jobs:
  publish:
    name: Install and publish
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
        with:
          node-version: 14.x
      - uses: expo/[email protected]
        with:
          expo-version: 4.x
          expo-token: ${{ secrets.EXPO_TOKEN }}
      - run: yarn install
      - run: expo publish

Things to know

Automatic Expo login

You need to authenticate for some Expo commands like

expo publish
and
expo build
. This action gives you configuration options to keep your workflow simple. You can choose if you want to authenticate using an
EXPO_TOKEN
or account credentials. Under the hood, it uses the
EXPO_CLI_PASSWORD
environment variable to make credentials authentication as secure as possible.

Note, this action only uses your token or credentials to authenticate with Expo. It doesn't store these anywhere.

Using the built-in cache

You can opt-in to caching the installation, making it a lot faster. Under the hood, it uses the

@action/cache
package to restore the Expo CLI installation. This action generates a unique cache key for the OS, used packager, and exact version of the Expo CLI. If you need more control over this cache, you can define a custom cache key with

expo-cache-key
.

Note, this cache will count towards your repo cache limit.

ENOSPC errors on Linux

When you run

expo publish
or
expo build
, a new bundle is created. Creating these bundles require quite some resources. As of writing, GitHub actions has some small default values for the
fs.inotify
settings. Inside this action, we included a patch that increases these limits for the current workflow. It increases the
max_user_instances
,
max_user_watches
and
max_queued_events
to
524288
. You can disable this patch by setting the
expo-patch-watchers
to
false
.

with :heart: byCedric

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