Interlace

by codingo

codingo /Interlace

Easily turn single threaded command line applications into a fast, multi-threaded application with C...

576 Stars 99 Forks Last release: about 1 year ago (1.6) GNU General Public License v3.0 296 Commits 7 Releases

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Interlace

Easily turn single threaded command line applications into a fast, multi-threaded application with CIDR and glob support.

Python 3.2|3.6 License Twitter Twitter

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Interlace: A Tool to Easily Automate and Multithread Your Pentesting & Bug Bounty Workflow Without Any Coding

Table of Contents

Setup

Install using:

$ python3 setup.py install

Dependencies will then be installed and Interlace will be added to your path as

interlace
.

Usage

| Argument | Description | |------------|--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------| | (stdin) | Pipe target lists from another application in comma-delimited format, CIDR notation, or as an individual host| | -t | Specify a target or domain name either in comma-delimited format, CIDR notation, or as an individual host | | -tL | Specify a list of targets or domain names | | -e | Specify a list of targets to exclude either in comma-delimited format, CIDR notation, or as an individual host | | -eL | Specify a list of targets to exclude | | -threads | Specify the maximum number of threads to run at any one time (DEFAULT:5) | | -timeout | Specify a timeout value in seconds for any single thread (DEFAULT:600) | | -c | Specify a single command to execute over each target or domain | | -cL | Specify a list of commands to execute over each target or domain | | -o | Specify an output folder variable that can be used in commands as _output_ | | -p | Specify a list of port variable that can be used in commands as _port_. This can be a single port, a comma-delimited list, or a range using dash notation | | -pL | Specify a list of proxies | | --proto | Specify protocols that can be used in commands as _proto_ | | -rp | Specify a real port variable that can be used in commands as _realport_ | | -random | Specify a directory of files that can be randomly used in commands as _random_ | | --no-bar / --sober | If set then progress bar be stripped out | | --no-cidr | If set then CIDR notation in a target file will not be automatically be expanded into individual hosts | | --no-color | If set then any foreground or background colours will be stripped out | | --silent | If set then only important information will be displayed and banners and other information will be redacted | | -v | If set then verbose output will be displayed in the terminal |

Further information regarding ports

| Example | Notation Type | |---------|----------------------------------------------------------| | 80 | Single port | | 1-80 | Dash notation, perform a command for each port from 1-80 | | 80,443 | Perform a command for both port 80, and port 443 |

Further information regarding targets

Both

-t
and
-tL
will be processed the same. You can pass targets the same as you would when using nmap. This can be done using CIDR notation, dash notation, or a comma-delimited list of targets. A single target list file can also use different notation types per line.

Alternatively, you can pass targets in via STDIN and neither -t or -tL will be required.

Variable Replacements

The following variables will be replaced in commands at runtime:

| Variable | Replacement | |-----------|-------------------------------------------------------------------------| | _target_ | Replaced with the expanded target list that the current thread is running against | | _host_ | Works the same as _target_, and can be used interchangeably | | _output_ | Replaced with the output folder variable from Interlace | | _port_ | Replaced with the expanded port variable from Interlace | | _realport_ | Replaced with the real port variable from Interlace | | _proxy_ | Replaced with the proxy list from Interlace | | _random_ | Replaced with the randomly chosen file from Interlace |

Advanced Command File Usage

Interlace also makes the use of two additional features for controlling execution flow within a command file:

_blocker_
and
_block:_
. Blockers prevent execution of commands listed after them, until all commands before them have completed, and blocks can be used to force sequential execution of commands listed within a block, for a target.

These are run on a per-target level. If there are threads available and a blocker is in the way for the current target, Interlace will start commands from the next target within a target list in order to maximise efficiency.

Using these features will allow you to control the execution flow for individual targets more directly in order to prevent commands from running out of order.

Blocker

Blockers prevent anything below them from executing until all commands above them have completed (for the currently active host). For example, in the following:

mkdir -p _output_/_target_/scans/
_blocker_
nmap _target_ -oA _output_/_target_/scans/_target_-nmap

The use of a blocker here prevents nmap from running on a target before the base folder structure has been created, preventing nmap from throwing an exception.

Blocks

Blocks force everything within them to run sequentially. You can also use multiple blocks per command file. For example, in the following:

_block:nmap_
mkdir -p _target_/output/scans/
nmap _target_ -oN _target_/output/scans/_target_-nmap
_block:nmap_
nikto --host _target_

In this example, the block would run the same as before, but assuming the thread count is high enough then nikto would begin to run immediately, passing results back to the terminal (whilst nmap and file creation happened in the background).

Usage Examples

Run Nikto Over Multiple Sites

Let's assume that you have a file

targets.txt
that has the following contents:
bugcrowd.com
hackerone.com

You could use Interlace to run over any number of targets within this file using: bash ```

➜ /tmp interlace -tL ./targets.txt -threads 5 -c "nikto --host target > ./target-nikto.txt" -v

Interlace v1.0 by Michael Skelton (@codingo) & Sajeeb Lohani (@sml555)

[14:33:23] [THREAD] [nikto --host hackerone.com > ./hackerone.com-nikto.txt] Added to Queue [14:33:23] [THREAD] [nikto --host bugcrowd.com > ./bugcrowd.com-nikto.txt] Added to Queue ``

This would run Nikto over each host and save to a file for each target. Note that in the above example since we're using the
>` operator, the results won't be fed back to the terminal; however this is desired functionality as otherwise we wouldn't be able to attribute which target Nikto results were returning for.

For applications where you desire feedback, simply pass commands as you normally would (or use

tee
).

Run Nikto Over Multiple Sites and Ports

Using the above example, let's assume you want independent scans to be run for both ports

80
and
443
for the same targets. You would then use the following:
➜  /tmp interlace -tL ./targets.txt -threads 5 -c "nikto --host _target_:_port_ > ./_target_-_port_-nikto.txt" -p 80,443 -v
=========================================================================
Interlace v1.0  by Michael Skelton (@codingo_) & Sajeeb Lohani (@sml555_)
=========================================================================
[14:33:23] [THREAD] [nikto --host hackerone.com:80 > ./hackerone.com-nikto.txt] Added to Queue 
[14:33:23] [THREAD] [nikto --host bugcrowd.com:80 > ./hackerone.com-nikto.txt] Added to Queue 
[14:33:23] [THREAD] [nikto --host bugcrowd.com:443 > ./bugcrowd.com-nikto.txt] Added to Queue 
[14:33:23] [THREAD] [nikto --host hackerone.com:443 > ./hackerone.com-nikto.txt] Added to Queue 

Run a List of Commands against Target Hosts

Often with penetration tests, there's a list of commands you want to run on nearly every job. Assuming that list includes testssl.sh, nikto, and sslscan, you could save a command list with the following in a file called

commands.txt
:
nikto --host _target_:_port_ > _output_/_target_-nikto.txt
sslscan _target_:_port_ >  _output_/_target_-sslscan.txt
testssl.sh _target_:_port_ > _output_/_target_-testssl.txt

If you were then given a target

example.com
, you could run each of these commands against this target using the following:
bash
interlace -t example.com -o ~/Engagements/example/ -cL ./commands.txt -p 80,443
This would then run nikto, sslscan, and testssl.sh for both port 80 and 443 against example.com and save the files into your engagements folder.

CIDR notation with an application that doesn't support it

Interlace automatically expands CIDR notation when starting threads (unless the

--no-cidr
flag is passed). This allows you to pass CIDR notation to a variety of applications:

To run a virtual host scan against every target within

192.168.12.0/24
using a direct command you could use:
bash
interlace -t 192.168.12.0/24 -c "vhostscan _target_ -oN _output_/_target_-vhosts.txt" -o ~/scans/ -threads 50
This is despite VHostScan not having any in-built CIDR notation support. Since Interlace expands the notation before building a queue of threads, VHostScan for all intents is only receiving a list of direct IP addresses to scan.

Glob notation with an application that doesn't support it

Interlace automatically expands glob ranges when starting threads. This allows you to pass glob ranges to a variety of applications:

To run a virtual host scan against every target within

192.168.12.*
using a direct command you could use:
bash
interlace -t 192.168.12.* -c "vhostscan _target_ -oN _output_/_target_-vhosts.txt" -o ~/scans/ -threads 50
Yet again, VHostScan does not have any inbuilt glob range format support.

Dash (-) notation with an application that doesn't support it

Interlace automatically expands dash ranges when starting threads. This allows you to pass glob ranges to a variety of applications:

To run a virtual host scan against every target within

192.168.12.1-15
using a direct command you could use:
bash
interlace -t 192.168.12.1-15 -c "vhostscan _target_ -oN _output_/_target_-vhosts.txt" -o ~/scans/ -threads 50
Yet again, VHostScan does not have any inbuilt dash range format support.

Threading Support for an application that doesn't support it

Run a virtual host scan against each host in a file (

target-lst.txt
), whilst also limiting scans at any one time to 50 maximum threads.

This could be done using a direct command:

bash
interlace -tL ./target-list.txt -c "vhostscan -t _target_ -oN _output_/_target_-vhosts.txt" -o ~/scans/ -threads 50

Or, alternatively, to run the same command as above, but using a command file:

bash
interlace -cL ./vhosts-commands.txt -tL ./target-list.txt -threads 50 -o ~/scans
This presumes that the content of the command file is:
vhostscan -t $target -oN _output_/_target_-vhosts.txt
This would output a file for each target in the specified output folder. You could also run multiple commands simply by adding them into the command file.

Exclusions

Interlace automatically excludes any hosts provided when specified via the

-e
or
-eL
arguments. These arguments are also compatible with the range notations mentioned above (CIDR, glob, and dash)

To run a virtual host scan against every target in the CIDR range

192.168.12.0/24
but not for the targets in the range
192.168.12.0/26
, using a direct command, you could use:
bash
interlace -t 192.168.12.0/24 -e 192.168.12.0/26 -c "vhostscan _target_ -oN _output_/_target_-vhosts.txt" -o ~/scans/ -threads 50

Run Nikto Using Multiple Proxies

Using the above example, let's assume you want independent scans to be via different proxies for the same targets. You would then use the following:

➜  /tmp interlace -tL ./targets.txt -pL ./proxies.txt -threads 5 -c "nikto --host _target_:_port_ -useproxy _proxy_ > ./_target_-_port_-nikto.txt" -p 80,443 -v

Authors and Thanks

Originally written by Michael Skelton (codingo) and Sajeeb Lohani (sml555) with help from Charelle Collett (@Charcol0x89) for threading refactoring and overall approach, and Luke Stephens (hakluke) for testing and approach.

Contributions

Contributions to this project are very welcome. If you're a newcomer to open source and would like some help in doing so, feel free to reach out to us on Twitter (@codingo_) / (@sml555_) and we'll assist wherever we can.

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