PolicyServer.Local

by PolicyServer

PolicyServer / PolicyServer.Local

Sample OSS version of PolicyServer

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PolicyServer (local version)

We've been talking about separation of concerns of authentication and authorization quite a bit in the past (see the blog post that started all and the video that showed off our first prototype). As a result, we have developed a commercial product called PolicyServer as part of a joint venture with Solliance. Here are a few links to the product and pricing page:

In this repository we have provided a free, open source, and simplified version of the authorization pattern we propose - with the necessary code to create a simple implementation in your applications. This is meant to be a sample, if you find this approach useful, feel free to copy the code and use it in your own projects.

NOTE: This open source library does not have the advanced features of the PolicyServer product like hierarchical policies, client/server separation, management APIs and UI, caching, auditing etc., but the client library is syntax-compatible with its "big brother" in terms of integration to your applications. This allows an upgrade path with minimal code changes if you start with this client library.

Important This code-base was our proof of concept for the client-side programming model. We will leave it here for other people that might find this useful, too. It is not maintained anymore!

Defining an authorization policy

The authorization policy is defined as a JSON document (typically in

appsettings.json
). In the policy you can define two things
  • application roles (and the users that are members of these roles)
  • application permissions (and which application roles have these permissions)

Defining application roles

Role membership can be defined based on the IDs (aka subject IDs) of the users, e.g.:

{
  "Policy": {
    "roles": [
      {
        "name": "doctor",
        "subjects": [ "1", "2" ]
      }
    ]
  }
}

The value of the user's

sub
claim is used to determine role membership at runtime.

Additionally identity roles coming from the authentication system can be mapped to application roles, e.g.:

{
  "Policy": {
    "roles": [
      {
        "name": "patient",
        "identityRoles": [ "customer" ]
      }
    ]
  }
}

The user's

role
claims are used to map identity roles to application roles.

Mapping permissions to application roles

In the permissions element you can define permissions, and which roles they are mapped to:

{
  "Policy": {
    "roles": [
      {
        "name": "doctor",
        "subjects": [ "1", "2" ],
        "identityRoles": [ "surgeon" ]
      },
      {
        "name": "nurse",
        "subjects": [ "11", "12" ],
        "identityRoles": [ "RN" ]
      },
      {
        "name": "patient",
        "identityRoles": [ "customer" ]
      }
    ],
    "permissions": [
      {
        "name": "SeePatients",
        "roles": [ "doctor", "nurse" ]
      },
      {
        "name": "PerformSurgery",
        "roles": [ "doctor" ]
      },
      {
        "name": "PrescribeMedication",
        "roles": [ "doctor", "nurse" ]
      },
      {
        "name": "RequestPainMedication",
        "roles": [ "patient" ]
      }
    ]
  }
}

Using the PolicyServer client library in your ASP.NET Core application

First, you need to register the PolicyServer client with the DI system. This is where you specify the configuration section that holds your policy.

services.AddPolicyServerClient(Configuration.GetSection("Policy"));

After that you can inject the

IPolicyServerClient
anywhere into your application code, e.g.:
public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private readonly IPolicyServerRuntimeClient _client;

public HomeController(IPolicyServerRuntimeClient client)
{
    _client = client;
}

}

PolicyServerClient
has three methods:
  • EvaluateAsync
    - returns application roles and permissions for a given user.
  • IsInRoleAsync
    - queries for a specific application role
  • HasPermissionAsync
    - queries for a specific permission
public async Task Secure()
{
    // get roles and permission for current user
    var result = await _client.EvaluateAsync(User);
    var roles = result.Roles;
    var permissions = result.Permissions;

// check for doctor application role
var isDoctor = await _client.IsInRoleAsync(User, "doctor");

// check for PrescribeMedication permission
var canPrescribeMedication = await _client.HasPermissionAsync(User, "PrescribeMedication");

// rest omitted

}

You can now use this simple client library directly, or build higher level abstractions for your applications.

Mapping permissions and application roles to user claims

Instead of using the

PolicyServerClient
class directly, you might prefer a programming model where the current user's claims are automatically populated with the policy's application roles and permissions. This is mainly useful if you want to use the standard
ClaimsPrincipal
-based APIs or the
[Authorize(Roles = "...")]
attribute.

A middleware (registered with

UsePolicyServerClaims
) is provided for this purpose, and runs on every request to map the user's authorization data into claims:
public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
    app.UseAuthentication();
    app.UsePolicyServerClaims();

app.UseStaticFiles();
app.UseMvcWithDefaultRoute();

}

Then in the application code you could query application roles or permissions like this:

// get all roles
var roles = User.FindAll("role");

// or var isDoctor = User.HasClaim("role", "doctor");

Mapping permissions to ASP.NET Core authorization policies

Another option is to automatically map permissions of a user to ASP.NET Core authorization policies. This way you can use the standard ASP.NET Core authorization APIs or the

[Authorize("permissionName")]
syntax.

To enable that, you need to register a custom authorization policy provider when adding the PolicyServer client library:

services.AddPolicyServerClient(Configuration.GetSection("Policy"))
    .AddAuthorizationPermissionPolicies();

This will allow you to decorate controllers/actions like this:

[Authorize("PerformSurgery")]
public async Task PerformSurgery()
{
    // omitted
}

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